Robotic Partial Knee Replacement

Robotic Surgery

Over the last decade, new surgical tools, including computer navigation and robotic surgery, have gained access to the operating room. For a lot of procedures these high precision tools are not required for experienced surgeons. However, Dr. Boettner utilizes both procedures if indicated. He has gained experience with robotic surgery for primary total hip replacement as well as partial knee replacements and is currently uses robotic surgery for almost all of his partial knee replacements. Computer-assisted surgery is not a guarantee of a perfect surgery and often patients have the feeling that the computer will ultimately make things better. Our philosophy is that the combination of an experienced surgeon, with the guidance of a computer, can improve your outcome and that is why we implement thistechnology. Especially in partial knee replacements, they allow us to better simulate how the new artificial joint will function in your body and that will ensure good outcome of your surgery.

The following information are provided by MAKO Surgical Corp.

MAKOplasty® / Partial Knee Resurfacing

knee replacement

Partial knee replacement is a treatment option for people with early to mid-stage osteoarthritis (OA) that has not yet impacted their entire knee. Only the diseased portion of the knee is replaced, sparing healthy bone and the ligaments known as the ACL (anterior cruciate ligament) and PCL (posterior cruciate ligament).

MAKOplasty Partial Knee Resurfacing is an advanced partial knee surgery performed with the RIO® Robotic Arm Interactive Orthopedic System. It can be performed as a unicompartmental procedure to address OA in any of the three compartments of the knee: the medial (inner), patellofemoral (top), or lateral (outer) compartments. There is also a bicompartmental option for OA in both the medial and patellofemoral compartments.

What are the benefits of MAKOplasty®?

Partial knee replacement can be a challenging procedure to perform accurately on a consistent basis using manual techniques. Robotic arm assisted MAKOplasty enables consistent results and more accurate implant placement – which is an important factor in the life expectancy of implants. In an ongoing study, MAKOplasty resulted in both greater accuracy in implant placement and less pain in the first eight weeks post-surgery compared to manual partial knee replacement using Oxford® implants.1 Another study found that unicompartmental MAKOplasty patients who received RESTORIS® MCK Medial Onlay implants, showed a very low failure rate of only 0.4% at two years2, which is nine times lower than that of manual surgery. The study was conducted by four surgeons, who evaluated 201 patients (224 knees).2

knee pain

How does MAKOplasty® Work?

Before surgery, a CT scan is taken of the patient’s knee, and a 3D model created using the RIO system’s software. From this model, a pre-surgical plan is developed for the positioning of implants based on that patient’s unique anatomy.

To ensure implants are optimally positioned and that the soft tissues of the knee are balanced for a good surgical outcome, surgeons can test and fine tune the plan before surgery by moving the leg through different ranges of motion. The RIO provides measurements and visualization, and the surgeon adjusts the plan as needed.

Once the surgical plan is finalized, it is programmed into the RIO, which creates a safety zone for bone removal. While the surgeon guides the robotic arm and is in control of it at all times, the RIO ensures that bone removal stays with the safety zone of the surgical plan, providing auditory, visual and tactile feedback, stopping the robotic arm if necessary before bone can be removed outside the planned area. Once the bone preparation is complete, the implants are placed in the knee.

Learn More About MAKOplasty® Knee

As a knee arthroplasty procedure, MAKOplasty® is typically covered by Medicare- approved and private health insurers.

*Oxford is a registered trademark of Biomet, Inc.

1. Blyth MJ, Smith J, Jones B, MacLean III AB, Anthony, Rose P. Does robotic surgical assistance improve the accuracy of implant placement in unicompartmental knee arthroplasty? AAOS 2013 Annual Meeting, Chicago, IL.

2. Roche MW, Coon T, Pearle AD, Dounchis J. Two year survivorship of robotically guided medial MCK onlay, 25th Annual Congress of ISTA, October 3-6, 2012, Sydney, Australia.